Appreciating Men and Women Who Died in Service and Helping Disabled Veterans in New Jersey

honoring veterans who died or were disabled

Graves at Arlington National Cemetery bear silent witness to the sacrifices of our service men and women.

Today, Memorial Day, the Advancing Opportunities team remembers and pays respect to our brave men and women lost in battle. We are ever grateful to them and their families for their sacrifice.

However, other veterans do make it home but sustain lifelong disabilities. For them, there are assistive technology solutions; our team of professionals at the Assistive Technology Center is ready to assist, whether the need is for mobility hardware or augmentative communication—and anything in between.

 

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or other needs, state government agencies right here in New Jersey are ready to help. The New Jersey  Department of Military and Veterans Affairs (NJDMVA) is dedicated to “serving those who served.” The agency has produced the handy New Jersey Veterans’ Benefits Guide. The guide lists clinics throughout the state, provides information on health insurance, and lists regional Vet Centers to assist with benefits. Also critically important is information on assistance with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), an increasingly common disability. Veterans will find organizations that help with employment (including job training), entrepreneurship, training and education, recreation, and transportation, along with specific disabilities. NJDMVA also offers medals and awards in recognition of distinguished service. “I owe you! Veterans, you may be able to receive benefits you’re not even aware of!”

Also worth consulting is the Disabled American Veterans Department of New Jersey. To all who served, along with their families, we thank you!

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Our Most Notable and Favorite Disability Articles for the Week Ending May 19, 2017

Lakeland Bus

This vehicle is a combination of a transit bus and a motor coach, used by multiple companies in northern New Jersey to ferry suburban commuters to New York City. Lakeland, based in Dover, NJ, still exists; the company in fact donated this bus to the museum and the CEO pays for its upkeep. This very bus was also a movie star, having appeared in Forrest Gump. Photo: Daniel L. Berek

At Advancing Opportunities, we excel in providing residential and respite services to people of with all disabilities, along with advocacy and education services for parents and guardians and assistive technology support. As a leader in the field, we are pleased to share our experience, knowledge, and expertise with the disability community through our social media outlets: Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Pinterest. In our Disability and Ability Highlights of the Week column, we will select the best of what we found and shared and present them. Please click on the titles with embedded links to find the full article.

In addition, we are specialists in the area of assistive technology and offer a huge array of services; the Assistive Technology Center is New Jersey’s premier source of information and equipment.

 

Advancing Opportunities job announcement of the week:

We’re hiring! Advancing Opportunities is seeking a full-time Assistant Director of Intake and Behavioral Services in our Residential Services Department.

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Studio Shot of a Mixed Age, Multiethnic Group of Men and Women Standing in a Line

JOB SUMMARY: The Assistant Director of Intake and Behavioral Services shall be responsible for developing and implementing a comprehensive internal and external marketing and intake plan that fulfills Advancing Opportunities’ residential contract and expands the residential services throughout the state. The Assistant Director of Intake and Behavioral Services promotes the professional development that enhances operational activities and the specialized services provided to learners/clients of Advancing Opportunities. The Assistant Director of Intake and Behavioral Services will be proficient in Behavior Analysis in order to complete professional assessments of those consumers referred for services. He or she will performs other duties, as deemed necessary for the agency.

For more information on this position, please visit us online.

 

Disability in the news (mostly in New Jersey, the population we serve):

More and more schools in New Jersey see the many benefits of inclusion of students with disabilities and their non-disabled peers.

How diverse are those companies issuing reports on their diversity?

 

For parents of a child with a disability (parenting):

One kind woman surprised a mom during her son with autism’s meltdown.Autism-stacking-cans

The New Jersey Department of Human Services, Division of Mental Health & Addiction Services, announces toll-free access to the publicly funded substance-use treatment provider community for adults affected by the disease of addiction.

 

Special Education:

The idea of Universal Design is not about kindness, or about compliance with the ADA. It is about common sense. When more people participate, everyone wins because human beings learn from each other.

 

Assistive technology:

 This new touchable tablet helps guide people with vision disabilities.

Augmented Ability: “Assistive Tech Gets Smart” – From braille smartwatches to GPS-enabled shoes, intuitive, connected technology is changing the game for people with disabilities.

BackMap helps visually impaired navigate cities and indoor areas

This 3D-printed arm was designed to help a boy play the cello.

 

Employment for people with disabilities:

One small business is hiring autistic adults and finding success.

Newly published: Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA): New Resources.

 

Informative, positive, noteworthy (or all three!):

 Here is a play list from TED Talks – Ten talks on “Designing for Disability”

Meet the dad who quit his job to run a Minecraft server for autistic children. Autcraft is a haven like few others on the Internet: free from bullying, with a strong and supportive community.

 

People with a disability in the community (disability rights and acceptance; inclusion):

The star of a new comic book has Down syndrome.

Even with ADA, people with disabilities in a wheelchair too often find themselves relegated to de facto segregation. Other times, freedom of movement is severely impinged. These issues are particularly acute for disabled black men and women.

 

Disability awareness and appreciation:

This Oscar-nominated documentary about autism celebrates the outsider.

Blog piece: “How Having a Disabled Mom Helped Shape My Identity as a Disabled Woman”

A character with autism is at the center of prime-time TV drama coming this fall.

 

Medical news – research:

A recent research study shows that treatment with the common type 2 diabetes drug metformin improves social, behavioral, and neuron deficits in mouse model of fragile X.

A survey finds that one in two autistic adults have a low sense of well-being.

Our Most Notable and Favorite Disability Articles for the Week Ending May 12, 2017

An_itinerant_surgeon_extracting_stones_from_a_man's_head;_sy_Wellcome_V0016245

This historic illustration depicts an itinerant surgeon extracting stones from a man’s head; symbolizing the expulsion of ‘folly'(insanity) .
Pencil drawing by Pieter Jansz Quast, via the Wellcome Trust

At Advancing Opportunities, we excel in providing residential and respite services to people of with all disabilities, along with advocacy and education services for parents and guardians and assistive technology support. As a leader in the field, we are pleased to share our experience, knowledge, and expertise with the disability community through our social media outlets: Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, YouTube, and Pinterest. In our Disability and Ability Highlights of the Week column, we will select the best of what we found and shared and present them. Please click on the titles with embedded links to find the full article.

In addition, we are specialists in the area of assistive technology and offer a huge array of services; the Assistive Technology Center is New Jersey’s premier source of information and equipment.

Advancing Opportunities job announcement of the week:

We’re hiring!

Advancing Opportunities has immediate openings for part-time Direct-Support Professionals in residential care programs throughout New Jersey. In May, we will be holding job from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., as follows: 

  • Wednesday, May 17. Parsippany Event. Family Resource Network, 322 U.S. Hwy. 46, Ste. 290, Phillipsburg, NJ 08865
  • Tuesday, May 23. Marlboro Event. Marlboro Free Public Library, 1 Library Ct., Marlboro, NJ 07746

Advancing Opportunities provides supports to individuals with disabilities and their families, so they can live fully in the community.

Our team includes a diverse collection of men and women committed to treating the people and families we serve with dignity and respect and providing the highest quality services and supports.

Employees of the agency enjoy paid training and an excellent array of benefits, including health care and dental benefits for all eligible full-time staff and a 401(k) retirement plan for all eligible employees.

If you are unable to make it to one of the job fair open houses, you can also visit us online, at: http://advopps.org/careers/

Advancing Opportunities news:

Carly Hewitt, honored with our Andrew J. Murphy award for self-advocacy, was featured in this article how assistive technology continues to help her realize her dreams.

Carly H

 

 

 

Disability in the news (mostly in New Jersey, the population we serve):

Learning Ally is offering two National Achievement Awards:  one is for a student with a visual impairment or blindness, and one is for a student with a learning disability. The student has to use Learning Ally. Find out if you are eligible for these prestigious awards. Deadline to apply is Wednesday, May 31.

 

New Jersey Governor Christie signed into law Bill S1825/A3432, which “establishes the New Jersey Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder Mobility and Support Services Task Force to study and make recommendations concerning the mobility and support services needs of New Jersey adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).”

 

 

 

For parents of a child with a disability (parenting):

“To the moms who raise a loved one on the spectrum, this weekend is Mother’s Day, and I wanted you to know how important you are to your child….”

 

Parents can help children with autism become better storytellers.

 

A New Jersey father of two autistic children finds solace and meaning through golf.

 

 

 

Special Education:

“Autistic girls and school exclusion: Perspectives of students and their parents”
Open-source article in the journal Autism & Developmental Language Impairments

 

Teachers and students are working together to encourage self-regulation. This is especially important for autistic students, accepting their “autistic behaviors” in this context.

 

 

 

Advocacy and self-advocacy:

A woman with an “invisible disability” shares how her condition inspired her to become a disability advocate.

 

 

 

Informative, positive, noteworthy (or all three!):

A special mom of special children: “…External successes and failures will be your successes and failures. You get to have those on your own and I will rejoice and celebrate and swell with pride as if I created those monumental moments but I do not get to take credit for those.”

 

An 11-year-old boy with autism finds happiness through music: “It brought him into my world,” said his mother.

 

A mom of three boys with autism has found the time to write and illustrate a children’s book, Jasmine’s World of Autism, to inform other parents of a child with an autistic sibling.

 

 

 

The Arts and People with Disabilities

It’s about time! Mickey Rowe, an actor with autism, is starring in “Curious Incident”

 

 

 

People with a disability in the community (disability rights and acceptance; inclusion): 

Many children dream of one day walking down a runway. But for children with disabilities, that dream may seem out of reach. One community fashion show is making those fashionista dreams come true with a show designed to help children with disabilities, and local high school students, shine.

 

 

 

Disability awareness and appreciation:

Thanks to the hard work of one talented and caring individual—a two-year labor of love—or spreading the critically important message of autism awareness and appreciation. The message of empathy in this video will certainly extend to other children who are “different.”

 

Noteworthy blog piece: “Leaving Neverland: Autism and the Peter Pan Myth”

 

 

 

Medical news—research:

Jon Elder Robison: “Why autistic people like me need to help shape autism science.”

 

 

 

Beauty, glamour, and fashion: the inclusion of people with disabilities:

A woman with Down syndrome competes in the Miss USA state pageant.

 

 

 

Animals and animal therapy:

An autistic rider who found her soulmate in an “unmanageable and unhappy” horse has saved the mare from being sold thanks to the generosity of strangers.

Our Most Notable and Favorite Disability Articles for the Week Ending March 31, 2017

Our Most Notable and Favorite Disability Articles for the Week Ending March 31, 2017

Deserted Village (Feltville) - Church and Store Building

This is one of the buildings at the Deserted Village, also known as Feltville. This tower is a later addition. The site is now under the care of the Watchung Reservation, Union County, NJ.

At Advancing Opportunities, we excel in providing residential and respite services to people of with all disabilities, along with advocacy and education services for parents and guardians and assistive technology support. As a leader in the field, we are pleased to share our experience, knowledge, and expertise with the disability community through our social media outlets: Facebook, Twitter, Google+, LinkedIn, and Pinterest. In our Disability and Ability Highlights of the Week column, we will select the best of what we found and shared and present them. Please click on the titles with embedded links to find the full article.

https://www.facebook.com/AdvancingOpportunities/

https://plus.google.com/b/113741235817976526648/113741235817976526648/

https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/5237078/

https://twitter.com/AdvOpps

https://www.youtube.com/user/assistivetechcenter

https://www.pinterest.com/AdvOpps/

Please stop by our website, http://advopps.org/, and find out all we have to offer.  In addition, we are specialists in the area of assistive technology and offer a huge array of services; the Assistive Technology Center is New Jersey’s premier source of information and equipment.

Advancing Opportunities job announcement of the week:

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We’re hiring!

Advancing Opportunities has immediate openings for part-time Direct-Support Professionals in residential care programs throughout New Jersey. In April, we will be holding job fairs on the following days, from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., as follows:

  • Tuesday, April 11. Budd Lake. Advancing Opportunities, 98 U.S. Hwy. 46 W., Budd Lake, NJ
  • Thursday, April 20. Parsippany. Family Resource Network, 322 U.S. Hwy. 46 W., Ste. 290, Parsippany, NJ
  • Tuesday, April 25. Marlboro. Marlboro Free Public Library, 1 Library Ct., Marlboro, NJ

Advancing Opportunities provides supports to individuals with disabilities and their families, so they can live fully in the community.

Our team includes a diverse collection of men and women committed to treating the people and families we serve with dignity and respect and providing the highest quality services and supports.

Employees of the agency enjoy paid training and an excellent array of benefits, including health care and dental benefits for all eligible full-time staff and a 401(k) retirement plan for all eligible employees.

If you are unable to make it to one of the job fair open houses, you can also visit us online, at: http://advopps.org/careers/

Advancing Opportunities news:

Hoedown 2017 BarnMark your calendars for Saturday, April 22, 2017! It’s only a month away. Come and plan to join us for the best barn dance this side of the Mississippi! Each year, the agency holds several fundraising events. We consider them “friendraising” events as well. Join us and learn more about how you can help provide vital services and supports to children and adults with all types of disabilities.

http://advopps.org/hoedown

Disability in the news (mostly in New Jersey, the population we serve):

New Jersey adds 1,500 beds to community-based programs to accommodate people with mental illness. Advancing Opportunities is a major player in this residential care, allowing for maximum independence for this population.

This mom from Hopewell, NJ, (Mercer County) has worked tirelessly to raise both awareness and appreciation for children with Down syndrome, advocating for local parents.

Autism-stacking-cans

Enter a caption

Quinn, an 18-month-old boy with autism, purposefully stacks cans. Photographer: Andwhatsnext, via Wikimedia Commons.

For parents of a child with a disability (parenting):

A father and disability advocate creates an assistive technology app to assist his son with autism.

Quinn, an 18-month-old boy with autism, purposefully stacks cans. Photographer: Andwhatsnext, via Wikimedia Commons.

Special Education:

Slow processing speed and anxiety: here’s what you need to know.

Advocacy and self-advocacy:

This journal article examines the future of supported decision making for people with autism.

A violinist discusses using music to enact social change.

Assistive technology:

An exciting new piece of AAC assistive technology enhances accessibility for blind people.

With assistive technology, toddlers get up and go in their own set of wheels independently.

A neuroprosthesis enables a paralyzed man to feed himself independently.

This high-performance software for transcribing audio recordings can be a boon for people with dyslexia.

Employment for people with disabilities:

Programs in New Jersey offer young adults with autism independence and dignity through meaningful work.

Revisiting an autism employment success story: The Rising Tide Car Wash.

A recent report on PBS examines the need for more job opportunities for people with disabilities, who often still face discrimination. This is a matter of civil rights, as well as one of dignity and independence for the population we serve.

Informative, positive, noteworthy (or all three!):

Here are ten books that feature positive depictions of characters with a disability.

“Make it Stop.” A brand-new and powerful awareness video to foster understanding of people with autism.

The Arts and People with Disabilities

Six blind professional musicians ranging in age from 17 to 65 come together in a London recording studio to create and record a musical tribute to Louis Braille.
 

After a debilitating accident, William Heard took up painting and founded an arts center in Mississippi.

People with a disability in the community (disability rights and acceptance; inclusion):

Tenafly, NJ, housing offers a chance at independence for people with disabilities.  A leading disability advocate wrote an editorial.

Disability awareness and appreciation:

Teens describe their experiences with depression and anxiety.

“Twin Brothers Worlds Apart.” This British documentary, telling the stories of identical twins (except that one had autism), has garnered considerable acclaim.

Medical news – research:

New insight has been gained into the genetic and neuronal circuit mechanisms that may contribute to impaired sociability in some forms of autism spectrum disorder.

A drug used to treat excessive swelling seems to ease autism features in some children on the spectrum.

Two from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute:

April: Fostering an Awareness, Appreciation, and Understanding of Autism

World Autism Awareness Day

Central to the U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is “respect for the inherent dignity, individual autonomy including the freedom to make one’s own choices, and independence of persons… and full and effective participation and inclusion in society” (Article 3). This concept is reflected in this year’s theme for World Autism Awareness Day, “Toward Autonomy and Self-Determination.”

autism_ribbon

In the U.S. and throughout the world, the rate of autism is high, affecting children and adults of all socioeconomic and ethnic groups. According to the U.N., “Appropriate support, accommodation, and acceptance of this neurological condition allow those on the spectrum to enjoy equal opportunity, and full and effective participation in society.”

On March 31, 2017, the U.N. held conference on multiple aspects of autism, Toward Autonomy and Self-Determination, which included the following:

In welcoming everyone, Cristina Gallach, U.N. Under-Secretary-General for Communications and Public Information, said “We come together to renew our commitment to raising awareness of the rights of persons with autism – to equal opportunity and full participation in society, on an equal basis, with other citizens. To achieve this inclusive society that we aspire to, we must… ensure that the fundamental rights enshrined in the CRPD are respected.” This is a right that has been recognized since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was declared in 1948. Continued Ms. Gallach, “When [people with autism] enjoy equal opportunity for self-determination and autonomy, persons with autism will be empowered to make an even stronger positive impact on our shared future.”

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres could not be present, but he prepared a statement: “On this World Autism Awareness Day, let us play a part in changing attitudes toward persons with autism and in recognizing their rights as citizens who, like everyone else, are entitled to claim those rights and make decisions for their lives in accordance with their own will and preferences. Let us also renew our promise engraved in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to leave no one behind, and ensure that all people can contribute as active members to a peaceful and prosperous society.”

The keynote speaker, Simon Baron-Cohen, Director, Autism Research Centre, University of Cambridge, was gave an overview of the autism spectrum.

In regard to the “commitment to leave no one behind,” Jackie Pilgrim, a noted disability advocate spoke about dignity. In her work with NAMI Durham she spoke of her organization’s new 8-hour course for police and first-responders to replace the inadequate 1.5 hour course used previously, one for which they have shown “passion” to learn.

Barry Prizant, author of the landmark book Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism, summarized his philosophy:

Uniquely Human

  • De-pathologize autistic behavior (echolalia, stimming). It’s the way we deal with stress and self-regulate. They should not be repressed or otherwise “managed.”
  • Autism is not a tragedy, it can become one
  • Self-determination begins in early childhood. Children at an early age
  • Let’s look at ourselves.

Added Micheal John Carley. The best way to help is to examine ourselves and change the way we view people with autism.

An autism research and education organization, Autism Speaks, initiated the worldwide Light It Up Blue, campaign in its effort to raise autism awareness.    Among many in the autism community, both advocates and self-advocates, Autism Speaks is highly controversial, because that organization is seeking a cure, whereas many people prefer to see autism as simply another way of being, “different, not broken.”

 

National Autism Awareness Month

A ribbon made of multicolored puzzle pieces.  It has become one the most recognizable symbols of autism in the world.  The various colors reflect the many “faces” of autism, a condition often referred to as the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) because no two people with autism are alike.  (The cognitive abilities of people with ASD range from “nonverbal” to intellectually brilliant.)  The ribbon symbolizes solidarity and hope of a happy, fulfilling life for people with autism.  The puzzle pieces remind us that the condition and the people with it are still very much a mystery.

Autism Awareness Month first came to be some 25 years ago, when the Autism Society of America undertook an effort to promote autism awareness.  The primary objective was to “promote … inclusion and self-determination for all, and assure that each person with autism  is provided the opportunity to achieve the highest quality of life.”

 

Three short films that treat autism awareness and appreciation are worth noting:

  • “Make it Stop.” This is a brand-new awareness video to foster understanding of people with autism.
  •  “Talking in Pictures.”  This documentary dispels myths and stereotypes… at least as they apply to everyone with autism. “It’s not that we’re doing it wrong, it’s not that we’re autistic enough to fit in with the world’s idea of autism, it’s that the world’s idea of autism isn’t big enough to fit us all in!”
  • “Perfectly Normal,” is a film about Jordan, a man with Asperger’s, who discusses his everyday life, of which the New York Times publicized an important excerpt.

Furthermore, Sesame Street will debut Julia, a character with autism. This event will be covered in a later article.

 

And some noteworthy facts on autism:

  • In 2014, the U.S. Centers for Disease for Disease Control estimated the prevalence of autism as being 1 in 68 births.
  • Autism comes from the Greek autos” meaning “self.” Swiss psychiatrist Eugen Bleuler in 1910 used the New Latin term autismus to describe schizophrenic symptoms of children; US psychiatrist Leo Kanner first used the term autism in 1943.
  • Asperger’s syndrome is named after Austrian pediatrician Hans Asperger, who in 1944 first described the symptoms in children he was observing.

With a sincere effort of autism awareness, we will be able to treat this population with the dignity they deserve.

Our Most Notable and Favorite Disability Articles for the Week Ending January 27, 2017

spotted-turtle-great-swamp

This spotted turtle is just one of the numerous denizens of the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, Morris County, New Jersey. Photo: Daniel L. Berek

At Advancing Opportunities, we excel in providing residential and respite services to people of with all disabilities, along with advocacy and education services for parents and guardians and assistive technology support. As a leader in the field, we are pleased to share our experience, knowledge, and expertise with the disability community through our social media outlets: Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, and Pinterest. In our Disability and Ability Highlights of the Week column, we will select the best of what we found and shared and present them. Please click on the titles with embedded links to find the full article.

Please stop by our website, http://advopps.org/, and find out all we have to offer. In addition, we are specialists in the area of assistive technology and offer a huge array of services; the Assistive Technology Center is New Jersey’s premier source of information and equipment.

 

 

Advancing Opportunities job announcement of the week:

We at Advancing Opportunities are seeking a full-time office manager for our Budd Lake, NJ, office. The office manager uses leadership, organization, and communication skills to obtain an efficient flow of the daily office operation. The office manager is responsible for office purchasing, petty cash, purchase orders, telephones and clerical support to the director, managers and support staff. As a member of the administrative team, the office manager promotes clear and effective office communication. Please consult the attached flyer; our employment page is: http://advopps.org/jobs

office-manager-northern_page_1

 

 

Disability in the news (mostly in New Jersey, the population we serve):

The Kessler Foundation grants $2.5 million in support of employment opportunities for people with disabilities nationwide

 

 

For parents of a child with a disability (parenting):

An observation on school-refusal behavior among children with Asperger’s and others on the autism spectrum.

Having well thought-out house rules adds necessary structure for children with ADHD.

 

 

Advocacy and self-advocacy:

A new assistive technology exoskeleton might help people with disabilities walk again.

Roberta Cordano is the first Deaf woman to lead Gallaudet University, the world’s only liberal arts university for the deaf and hard of hearing.

Meet ten new disability advocates, women working hard for disability rights.

 

 

Assistive technology:

NoiseTag BCI (Brain Control Interface) is an assistive technology device for persons with ALS.

The Quark D2000 interface board: assistive technology for blind people.

An assistive technology advocacy group called Tikkun Olam Makers (TOM) meets to develop technological solutions for people with various disabilities. (Tikkun Olam is Hebrew for “to heal or repair the world,” an important tenet of Judaism.)

 

 

Informative, positive, noteworthy (or all three!):

A New Jersey girl raised money enabling a teen with cerebral palsy to use an adapted cycle and raise awareness of what he could do.

Night to Shine: Basketball star, Tim Trebow, is sponsoring 375 Valentine’s Day proms for people with various disabilities.

A pediatric dentist stresses early dental care for children with autism.

 

 

Disability awareness and appreciation:

Setting inspiration aside, a father tells the truth about his daughter with Down syndrome.

Life Animated is an excellent documentary on autism.

 

 

Medical news – research:

A recent trial involving gut microbiota holds promise in helping children with autism.

An Australian survey questions whether young children are being overdiagnosed with ADHD

 

 

Animals and animal therapy:

A little girl with autism battled with anxiety until she befriended a therapy cat.

Our Most Notable and Favorite Disability Articles for the Week Ending January 6, 2017

Gingerbread Castle in Hamburg, New Jersey

Gingerbread Castle. Although this former family amusement park in Hamburg, NJ,is now abandoned, it still tries to project its former glory and maintain dignity. The site is well looked after by local law enforcement, keeping vandalism at bay.

At Advancing Opportunities, we excel in providing residential and respite services to people of with all disabilities, along with advocacy and education services for parents and guardians and assistive technology support.  As a leader in the field, we are pleased to share our experience, knowledge, and expertise with the disability community through our social media outlets: Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn, and Pinterest.  In our Disability and Ability Highlights of the Week column, we will select the best of what we found and shared and present them.  Please click on the titles with embedded links to find the full article.

 

Please stop by our website, http://advopps.org/, and find out all we have to offer.  In addition, we are specialists in the area of assistive technology and offer a huge array of services; the Assistive Technology Center is New Jersey’s premier source of information and equipment.

 

 

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Advancing Opportunities job announcement of the week:

Advancing Opportunities has immediate openings for part-time Direct Support Professionals in residential care programs throughout New Jersey.

Candidates will be providing direct care to men and women with disabilities in residential support programs and group home settings. This entails includes supervision and/or assistance with personal care, daily living activities, recreational pursuits, transportation, medical appointments, or any other needs the individuals may have.

In January, we will be holding job fairs, each day from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., as follows:

  • Tuesday, January 10: Marlboro Public Library, 1 Library Ct., Marlboro, NJ
  • Wednesday, January 11: Phillipsburg Public Library, 200 Broubalow Way,Phillipsburg, NJ
  • Wednesday, January 18: 322 Rte. 46 W., Ste. 290, Parsippany, NJ.

If these locations or times are not convenient, please visit: http://advopps.org/directcare_openings

 

 

Disability in the news (mostly in New Jersey, the population we serve):

A New Jersey high school hockey goalie uses his mask to spread a message of autism awareness.

To build a future for their son, a Dallas couple plans $12 million community for young adults with autism.

 

For parents of a child with a disability (parenting, special needs):

The Sparrow sensory cart helps make Asperger’s more manageable for a teen.

 

Advocacy and self-advocacy:

This is an excellent article on going beyond the need of genetic testing and counseling, giving parents the tools they will need to accept their child’s disability and meet his or her needs, along with their own.

People with disabilities help other people with a disability.

 

Assistive technology:

 This 10-year-old girl has invented an amazing climbing mobility device.

Assistive technology finds its way to Ohio farms.

 

 

Employment for people with disabilities:

Where is autism employment heading in 2017?

 

Civil rights and accessibility:

Meet the guide dog that spies on people who ignore his owner.

The U.S. Department of Education released three new sets of guidelines today to assist the public in understanding how the Department interprets and enforces federal civil rights laws protecting the rights of students with disabilities.

 

Informative, positive, noteworthy (or all three!):

A model with chronic pain offers positive insights for 2017.

Climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro together brings a sense of community among the athletes and staff with disabilities.

Fans at a heavy metal concert make way so a man with cerebral palsy so he can have a place near the stage.

 

 

Disability awareness and appreciation:

A review of positive depictions of blindness in popular culture in 2016.

An advocacy organization enumerates the most noteworthy depictions of autism in the arts.

An autism documentary is planned for early 2017 on A&E.

 

Beauty, fashion, glamour people with a disability:

Adaptable, fashionable clothing worthy of a male model in a wheelchair.

 

Medical news – research:

Genes affecting our communication skills relate to genes for psychiatric disorder.