Passing It On: Choking Prevention for People with Developmental Disabilities — Special Needs Resource Blog

Children and adults with developmental disabilities have a higher risk of choking compared to the general population. Risk Factors Include: Some medical conditions that increase a person’s risk of choking are: Cerebral Palsy Seizure disorders Neurological and muscular disorders Down Syndrome Brain Injury Muscular Dystrophy Inability to swallow certain food textures and liquids Medication side […]

via Choking Prevention for People with Developmental Disabilities — Special Needs Resource Blog

In Addition
For New Jersey caregivers, this leaflet is a very good resource:

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A Brief Look at the Intersection of Women’s History, Black History, and Disability

The International Women's Day logo - Be bold for change

International Women’s Day 2017: #BeBoldForChange https://www.internationalwomensday.com/

 

 

International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month: In the US and most countries around the world, women with disabilities have faced multiple hardships in the form of reduced access and sometimes outright discrimination in education, housing, and employment – both as women and as people with a disability. In addition, women of color often face a third challenge. A blog writer took a look back on 14 remarkable women of color of the past who have made powerful differences for the present and the future.

As February was Black History Month and March is Women’s History Month, we’ll examine the intersection of the two through the lens of disability. Many notable African American women made lasting contributions despite their disabilities. It is important, however, to “see the person, not the disability.” The late Australian comedienne and disability advocate coined the term inspiration porn in protest that people with disabilities should be objects of inspiration to make non-disabled people feel good.

Social worker and disability advocate Vilissa Thompson in her excellent blog “Ramp Your Voice” has compiled a list of important works and other resources of these individuals.

 

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Harriet Tubman (1822–1913)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harriet Tubman (1822–1913), abolitionist known for her work on the Underground Railroad, suffered epileptic seizures. Because of her short stature, she was seen among slave owners as disabled, a low risk of escape.

 

 

Fannie Lou Hamer (1917–1977), Civil Rights Activist black woman disabled with a disability from polio

Fannie Lou Hamer (1917–1977), Civil Rights Activist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fannie Lou Hamer (1917–1977), was a civil rights activist who suffered physical disabilities from childhood polio.

 

 

Maya Angelou (1928–2014), laureate poet

Maya Angelou (1928–2014), was laureate poet and wrote a series of memoirs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maya Angelou (1928–2014), laureate poet, found a voice in her memoirs and poetry. As a child, she developed selective mutism after a sexual assault.

 

 

Wilma Rudolph (1940–1994) track Olympian with physical disability

Wilma Rudolph (1940–1994), track and field Olympian

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wilma Rudolph (1940–1994) overcame childhood paralysis from the polio virus to become a track and field Olympian, the fastest woman in the world.

Honorable mention goes to Johnnie Lacy (1937-2010), an African American woman who from her wheelchair tirelessly advocated for the disability community. She has been recognized by the United African-Asian Abilities Club and the Temple University Disability Studies newspaper. (No copyright free photo of Ms. Lacy is available.)

Notable African American Women Make History, Despite Their Disabilities

harriet_tubman_1895-1          rosa-parks

fannie_lou_hamer_1964-08-22      Wilma Rudolph

 

February is Black History Month, and March is Women’s History Month. Many notable African American women made lasting contributions despite their disabilities. It is important, however, to “see the person, not the disability.” The late Australian comedienne and disability advocate coined the term inspiration porn in protest that people with disabilities should be objects of inspiration to make non-disabled people feel good. Four examples, from top to bottom and left to right, are Harriet Tubman (1822–1913), abolitionist known for her work on the Underground Railroad, Fannie Lou Hamer (1917–1977), civil rights activist, and Maya Angelou (1928–2014), laureate poet, and Wilma Rudolph (1940–1994), track and field Olympian.

Honoring Great Leadership

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Mount Rushmore honors presidents George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln. Source: Wikimedia Commons, public domain.

We, at Advancing Opportunities, would like to take the time to reflect on the deeds of George Washington and other great presidential leaders.

Leadership takes many forms. Most important, it starts with a vision of what should be and can be. In other words, leadership involves advocacy, standing up for what is right and what will benefit people, especially those who need a voice or assistance expressing it. Fundamental to leadership, what presidents such as George Washington and Abraham Lincoln possessed, is a vision, a compass to guide them – and the people they represent – to righteousness.

Here’s a Handy Resource from the Boggs Center

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The Boggs Center on Developmental Disabilities, part of the Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, has published a valuable resource for families of a child or other relative with a disability has published a helpful reference, Providing Respite: Supporting People and Families across the Lifespan, available as a fee PDF download. One of the co-sponsors of the booklet, the Family Resource Network, which includes Caregivers of New Jersey, a Service Coordinator.  As a leader in providing a wide range of services for people with disabilities in the state, Advancing Opportunities is ready to assist!

 

It Is Important to Reflect on Our Work to Continue Serving Our Individuals with Disabilities.

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Important to Ask Ourselves…

For those of us who are direct-support professionals, in residential and respite care, at the end of the day, it is important to reflect on our work by asking ourselves the following:

  • How did I help this individual?
  • What did I do to enrich his life?
  • How did I acknowledge her accomplishments?
  • How did I ensure his voice was heard and that he had the opportunity to make his own decisions?

In addition to asking these questions of ourselves to serve others, it is important to document the answers on reports on the progress toward their ISP goals! This last consideration can be critical for an agency to continue to receive funds… to keep on serving their consumers with disabilities.

Happy Holidays, Everyone!

All of us at Advancing Opportunities wish you, our consumers, families, and supporters (including those of you who have generously followed this blog!) peace and happiness for the holidays:

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Merry Christmas

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Happy Chanukkah – Chag Sameach

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The very best for Kwanzaa

 

And just in time for the holidays, here’s a special treat.  Overcoming her autistic social fears, this lovely ten-year-old girl gives a stunning rendition of Hallelujah that would have made Leonard Cohen proud.